900 Albert

  • Architecture
  • Interior Design
  • Landscape Architecture
  • Urban Design
  • Commercial/Civic
  • Mixed Use
  • Tall Buildings

Ottawa, ON

2.5 million sf

1,251 units

65 stories

Targeting LEED Gold

As the light rail expands the urban core, Ottawa’s LeBreton Flats is rapidly developing into a high-density mixed-use transit-oriented development (TOD) community. At 65 stories and 262 meters (884 feet), 900 Albert will be the tallest building in the national capitol, anchoring the district on the skyline and creating a new visual link across the city. With a direct link to a new light rail station and a broad array of uses, 900 Albert is a celebration of variety, diversity and possibility, connected through a cohesive design expression.

900 Albert is composed of three towers extending elegantly from a retail and community podium. The podium architecture is designed to build on the language of Ottawa’s architectural history, creating a strong visual integration with the surrounding community. Residential towers of 65 and 54 stories extend with vertical lines, and geometric steps that accentuate the slenderness and elegance of the forms. Residential clubs are located at multiple levels with full-floor amenities. A 27-story office tower further anchors the mix of uses, and all three towers are lit with a distinctive, subtle composition across the skyline. The interior architecture continues the language of the exterior facade by celebrating a rhythm of slenderness and verticality. Grand, open spaces and light-filled rooms with large expanses of glazing enhance views to one’s surroundings.

The concept of a “vertical village” creates a hub of gathering and connection and informs the placement and adjacencies of amenities inside the Market Hall. Movement through the hall is intentionally fluid and permeable. Moveable partitions allow flexibility and spaces are defined by finishes and materials rather than walls. Warm wood and natural stone reflect local geology and landscape while finishes inspire comfort and connection.

A dynamic mix of retailers—from coffee shops to bustling bars and restaurants—create a lobby-like atmosphere, intentionally blending complimentary public and private uses.