9/11/2015 | Posted at 10:00 pm

Climate Action Planning

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Summary

GGLO is proud to support Seattle’s world-leading goal of carbon neutrality by 2050 through its work with the Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment (OSE) on the 2013 Seattle Climate Action Plan (CAP), climate-friendly neighborhoods visualizations outreach project, and Green Ribbon Commission (GRC) Recommendations report.

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CAP Actions

Download the CAP here (11MB PDF) or click on cover at right.

The City actions in the 2013 CAP focus on those sources of emissions where City action and local community action will have the greatest impact: road transportation, building energy, and waste, which comprise the majority of local greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (see Chapter 3), and actions to increase local resilience to the unavoidable impacts of climate change (see Chapter 4). The CAP also includes information on actions we as individuals can take to reduce our climate impact through purchasing decisions (see Chapter 5). Community actions to reduce emissions from freight, air, and industry are discussed in the appendices.

Actions are categorized into two time-frames:

  • GHG Emissions Pie Chart_CAP - 145x180Actions to Implement by 2015–Short-term actions that should begin in the next three years to pilot new ideas, test new approaches, and lay the foundation for longer term action.
  • Actions to Implement by 2030–Long-term actions that will take time to implement but are essential for meeting Seattle’s climate protection goals.

Based on a high-level analysis, the package of actions detailed in the CAP has the potential to reduce GHG emissions in the passenger transportation and building energy sectors by 62% by 2030 and puts the city well on the path to meeting the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Developing the CAP

GRC-CAP ProcessTimelineArrow_144x356Since 2011, OSE has worked closely with the community, other City departments, City Council, and the Mayor to research, analyze and develop the recommended policies and actions that make up the Seattle Climate Action Plan (see summary of process in timeline at right). These actions detail a strategy for realizing the ambitious and long-term climate protection vision adopted for our community by the Mayor and City Council in Resolution 31312:

  • Reach Zero Net GHG Emissions by 2050
  • Prepare for the likely impacts of climate change

GGLO worked with OSE to organize and illustrate the CAP document to best communicate how Seattle contributes to climate change and how the City and community can work together to take action to reduce GHG emissions and advance other community goals, including building vibrant neighborhoods, fostering economic prosperity, and enhancing social equity.

Visualizing Climate-Friendly Communities

Achieving carbon neutrality will require a groundswell of community support, coupled with increasingly progressive urban policies and programs. For this reason, the public outreach process for Seattle’s Climate Action Plan draws extensively on visualizations to clearly illustrate the shared outcomes of policy choices to spark informed dialogue about relationships between land use, lifestyle patterns, and sustainability.

Better public transportation, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, increased commercial activity and housing, and new green infrastructure energize this typical main street.

Better public transportation, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, increased commercial activity and housing, and new green infrastructure energize this typical main street.

Mixed use buildings expand retail, housing and business space in this multifamily neighborhood; redesigned plantings and yards increase pedestrian and bicycle safety while also absorbing rainwater.

Mixed use buildings expand retail, housing and business space in this multifamily neighborhood; redesigned plantings and yards increase pedestrian and bicycle safety while also absorbing rainwater.

Vacant lots, yards, and planting strips are utilized for community food gardens and stormwater infrastructure; housing options are expanded with new duplexes, apartments, and backyard cottages.

Vacant lots, yards, and planting strips are utilized for community food gardens and stormwater infrastructure; housing options are expanded with new duplexes, apartments, and backyard cottages.

Team:

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Studio 216 (Climate Visualization Team)

GGLO Team:

Jeff Foster AIA, Principal
Chris Libby AIA, Principal
Alicia Daniels Uhlig, NCARB, Director of Sustainability, Principal
Dave Cutler AIA, Principal
Marieke Lacasse ASLA, CSLA, Senior Associate
Amanda Reed, and Tina Suh

Climate Action Plan Resources & Development Timeline:

2012: Green Ribbon Commission Issues Recommendations (12MB PDF)
2012: Technical Advisory Groups Issue Recommendations
2011: City Council Adopts Resolution 31312
2011: OSE Delivers “Getting to Zero: A Pathway to a Carbon Neutral Seattle” (PDF)
2010: City Council Hosts Expert Brownbag on Challenges to Becoming a Carbon Neutral City(video)
2008: OSE Delivers Community Greenhouse Gas Inventory (PDF)
2006: City Issues 2006 Climate Action Plan (PDF)
2006: City Establishes 2006 Green Ribbon Commission; GRC Issues Recommendations Report
2005: Seattle Signs US Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement
2002: City Launches “Clean, Green Fleet” Program
2000: City Launches Green Building Program

Other Related Resources:

Seattle 2030 District
Architecture 2030
Transit Oriented Communities: A Blueprint for Washington State (more info)

Related Presentations & Publications:

Capitol Hill Housing Forum: EcoDistrict

GGLO’s Building Performance Evaluations